Meet the new project championing Melbourne’s thriving electronic music scene
08.10.2020

Meet the new project championing Melbourne’s thriving electronic music scene

It’s time to get to know 333.

A new project has hit Melbourne that celebrates the city’s thriving electronic music scene. Providing a platform for artists to release their mixes, 333 has been established to help DJs and producers gain exposure through the current downturn, a time where artists have lost most if not all of their work.

We sat down with 333 curator Jake Hughes and Flow Music founder Corr Piccone to get the lowdown on their new series and learn about their plans to help Melbourne’s electronic music scene.

Hey guys, so what is 333 about? And what was the inspiration behind it?

Jake Hughes: 333 was founded to support and promote the best electronic music artists Melbourne has to offer. The lockdown created huge challenges for everyone but we believe in the future, this time will be remembered as a golden age of creative expression.

Corr Piccone: We are in the midst of cultural renaissance of music and arts. There has never been a better time to invest in creativity, which is why we are taking this chance to curate a collection of seminal mixes, representing all corners of Melbourne’s electronic music community.

What is the significance of the 333 number?

Piccone: 333 symbolises the path we’re on and is about surrendering to the flow of life, not resisting it. All our sets are based on this theme and are 3 hours and 33 minutes in length. The longer set format allows artists to express themselves fully, giving them the opportunity to delve deep into their musical palate, exploring different areas while taking the listener on a journey through their collection.

What is the criteria for selecting the artists?

Hughes: We are selecting artists on their creative integrity, those who ply their craft with a genuine passion and love their music. Like most music enthusiasts, we have broad interests and enjoy a variety of genres and styles. We want to ensure 333 is a true representation of the entire Melbourne dance music community and all its subcultures, from artists both big and small.

The platform we’re offering artists is huge. A recent mix from The PDC notched up more than 20,000 plays, so to say he was thrilled is an understatement. We’re really proud to host everyone on the series and promote their mixes to the best of our ability.

We understand you pay artists $333 for their sets. Why have you chosen to do that?

Piccone: We strongly believe artists should be fairly rewarded for their creative contributions and during these times, it’s never been more essential for artists to get paid. Many have had their entire livelihoods stripped away, whilst others have lost a crucial side income. So we are doing our bit to support the community through its time of need, giving back to those who have given us so many memorable moments on the dance floor and trying to help them to come out the other side, stronger than ever.

Why is it so important to support Melbourne’s dance music community right now?

Hughes: It goes without saying that this is the most challenging time the dance music community has ever faced. The financial implications of the entire industry being shut down indefinitely are immense, but this is just the start of it. For so many people, this is a way life. It’s an identity. For many, our social lives have been built around sharing moments on the dance floor. We hope 333 gives our community an opportunity to reconnect again through the shared love of music.

Can you tell us about the wider project and what you’re planning?

Piccone: We’re just in the process of setting up a label for the series and have signed tracks from a few artists we really admire. 333 will be investing a lot to promote each release, to ensure all artists get the platform they deserve. We’re committed to supporting the artists and paying them fairly, which is why we’ll be taking care of all the promotional costs and giving them a 50% cut of whatever we receive from sales. Melbourne-based talent who wish to submit their tracks for consideration should send an email to 333@flowmusic.one.

Is there anything else you want people to know about 333?

Piccone: 333 sessions was created by Flow Music, which also hosts the Flow Sessions mix series on its SoundCloud channel. Flow Sessions has been going since the beginning of lockdown in March and hosts a strong international lineup. We initially launched the series to promote Australian talent overseas before opening up the series to international artists, both big and small.

The channel has quickly become very popular, with nearly all the artists getting the biggest number of plays they’ve ever had. So far we’ve featured well established names like Giorgia Angiuli, Quivver, Dave Seaman, alongside some cool emerging talent, who we believe are set to blow up soon. Artists who would like to contribute to the project should get in touch through flowsessions@flowmusic.one.

Check out the 333 project via the Flow Sessions SoundCloud page and keep up to date with the project here.

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