Marika Hackman’s new album guiltlessly portrays the sexual complexities of queer relationships
04.09.2019

Marika Hackman’s new album guiltlessly portrays the sexual complexities of queer relationships

Words by Lexi Herbert

Any Human Friend sees the songwriter take another step in her evolution as an artist.

British indie-rock staple Marika Hackman has proven that she’s more than just a one-trick pony on her new LP, Any Human Friend. Hackman’s fourth album is a stark and guiltless look into the sexual – and occasionally emotional – complexities of queer relationships and love. And wanking.

The strongest songs on the album consist of stylistically messy instrumentals glued together by Hackman’s signature detached and cheeky alto. Throughout ‘come undone’, the quick guitar quips and groovy-beyond-belief bass lines rightfully steal the show. It’s a relatable exploration of the intersection of emotional and physical desire; she seems debilitated by choice as she sings, “I think that I love her, but I’m fucking another”.

‘Send my love’ sets a tone for future endeavours. Hackman visibly flexes her skills both musically and as a producer. Throughout the track, it feels like she’s initially telling us all a secret, and then letting us dance to it in a strobed-up school gym after dark.

Despite one or two less shiny tracks – ‘conventional ride’ lives up to its name – Any Human Friend is exciting to listen to. Not only does Hackman strip herself down for each song just like she has on the cover, but she doesn’t seem to be aiming to make it look easy. In fact, it looks pretty fucking hard, but she’s the Simone Biles of turning the crude into the beautiful.

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