Chicken Wishbone’s second album is a dexterous fusion of hip hop and jazz
04.09.2019

Chicken Wishbone’s second album is a dexterous fusion of hip hop and jazz

Words by Tom Parker

Bearing an incredible blend of genres and textures.

From a blend of hip hop and house one week, to a fusion of hip hop and jazz the next, the versatility of rap and R&B is laid bare with Chicken Wishbone’s stellar second LP, Dee Dah Doo Dee Dah.

The strident jazz current channelling Melbourne’s music nervous system has paved the way for bands such as 30/70, Zeitgeist Freedom Energy Exchange, WVR BVBY, Sunnyside and more to find a home. It’s the city’s most conspicuous music movement in recent years and it has, in part, come about in correspondence with the rise of electronic music.

While less electronic-leaning than other records from said revolution, Dee Dah Doo Dee Dah colours a canvas with much of the paint that inspired it. The seven-minute ‘Dee Dah Doo Dah’ opens proceedings as an epic medley of free jazz and soft rhymes as vocalist Brenna Edsell controls the tempo with her tip-toeing utters of “dee dah doo dah”.

Edsell’s voice decorates much of the first side and her soul sensibilities are the perfect fit for ‘Sour’ and ‘Idea1’. ‘High Livin’’ is the standout on the second side – an oscillating jazz number that toys with privilege. There’s so much to pick apart on this record, which ensures it’s a listen you can come back to again and again.