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Slum Sociable : Slum Sociable

Since finding success with their EP TQ in 2005, Slum Sociable have been building palpable anticipation for their debut album. 

The result is well worth the wait. Their self-titled album showcases the outfit’s growth both lyrically and sonically, displaying rich and detailed melodies and incredibly emotive lyrics.
 
Written over a period of three years, Slum Sociable is immaculately refined. It’s clear the duo exercised extreme precision in building the layered beats across the album – beats that work to create an immersive atmosphere the moment you press play. The album glides between upbeat funk and dark, ballad-type tracks, resulting in a well-rounded album that sweeps you away as it explores a range of different energies and moods.
 
As a whole, the album is a delicious concoction of textural synth-soaked melodies tinged with elements of jazz, soul and groove. Despite the undeniable attraction of the soundscapes displayed across the album, Slum Sociable shines brightest through its lyrical prowess, delivering poetic, thought-provoking lines which are further enhanced by Miller Upchurch’s delicate vocals.
 
There are several shining moments across Slum Sociable. Each track provides its own appeal. ‘14 Days’ delivers a percussive beat encapsulated in a whirlwind of swirling synth that’ll have you instantly moving along with it. ‘Moby Bryant’ showcases incredible musical dexterity with keys, electronic elements and brass , and the incredulous ear-worm qualities of ‘Castle’ will draw you back in again and again.
 
Slum Sociable have said that they wrote this album with the intention of creating tracks that work well live, and upon listening it’s all too easy to imagine the melodies being brought to life on the stage (though you’ll probably still find yourself dancing along to the tracks in your lounge room). With laid-back, ambient electronica infused with a heaping serve of groove, Slum Sociable is an album you’ll find yourself revisiting over and over again. 
 
It’s also worth mentioning that the album’s original release date was pushed back due to Upchurch’s struggle with his mental health – both a respectable decision for the band and an evident theme across the album, where lyrics explore emotional and often dark imagery. With a debut like this, Slum Sociable are a force to be reckoned with.
 
8.5/10