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The Peep Tempel say farewell with a milestone performance

There was something quite surreal about the entire event.

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Anna Madden

Hanging over the celebratory nature of the show was the sad knowledge held by all that this was a farewell to a much-loved band. A group that had toiled at their craft for the better part of a decade, eventually breaking through to a mainstream audience three years ago thanks to a woman called Carol and a miscreant named Trevor.
 
From the moment The Peep Tempel donned their instruments there was an almost uneasy electric energy in the air. No one was more aware than the three men onstage of how significant every moment from now until the last song would be. They looked nervous, but more than that they were clearly determined; and as soon as they launched into 'Kalgoorlie', it showed. Not a perceptible beat was misplaced, the band leaned into their set with energy and concentration, faithfully serving up cuts from their celebrated and most recent album Joy, with 'Totality' and 'Rayguns' following in quick succession. The latter was the first example of frontman Blake Scott’s knack for creating choruses that are both hook-laden and reminiscent of a football chant, which the crowd took to with aplomb.
 
By the time the band delved deeper into their catalogue with the Lester Moore trilogy of songs, a character that has been with them since their debut album in 2012, the majority of the audience seemed pretty boozed. Scott stopped everything briefly to tell people off for fighting, threatening that if it happened again he would end the show. The floor was a sticky mess and thick with empty cans as fans threw themselves at each other, feeding off the energy onstage, but at the same time ignoring a lot of what was happening.
 
However, that didn’t take away from the emotions that were rising to the top as The Peep Tempel entered the final portion of their set. Scott rested his head against Rayner’s during the final throes of 2014’s 'Big Fish', following a Batpiss stage invasion involving a giant inflatable fish.
 
Once crowd favourite 'Carol' was given one last triumphant fist-pumping outing, the band got nostalgic with an encore that included 2012’s high energy 'Down at The Peep Tempel' and ended with 'Thank You Machiavelli'.
 
“You’ve been absolutely amazing to us, thank you so much,” said a clearly emotional Scott. Calling longtime manager/label owner Adam Gorton to the stage, the band gathered for a long group hug and bade us a teary goodbye. At least for now, The Peep Tempel have left the theatre.
 
Highlight: Being able to salute one of the best bands this town has produced in living memory.
Lowlight: The testosterone levels.
Crowd favourite: 'Carol', 'Big Fish'