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Krystal Joined: 19th January 2012
Last seen: 27th February 2014

Johnny Gibson : Endless Search For Gold

 

Every now and then a drummer steps out from beyond the cloak of their drumkit and reveals themselves as both songwriter and multi-instrumentalist. Johnny Gibson, drummer for a host of Melbourne staples; including The Currency, Streams Of Whiskey and Swedish Magazines has done just that, presenting to the world his first solo album, Endless Search For Gold.
Opener Back Roads is unfortunately on the unremarkable side but for the most part is not indicative of things to come. Without Me follows on; a rollicking Australiana/folk-rock number lead by a pleasing piano line and featuring anthemic back ups recalling the likes of Jimmy Barnes. The title track shines sweetly with it’s earthy banjo plucking and earnest lyrical content while Old Photos country rock flavor boasts well-worn melodies. Drew Her A Rose gives the album a necessary boost in tempo with its’ bluegrass stomp and Black Coat, Black Hat peaks your curiosity with it’s formidable story telling. It becomes noticeable on the album that Gibsons’ vocals maintain themselves at one constant and somewhat monotone pitch, but the honest and vulnerable quality of his voice enables him to render the fact superfluous.

 

The songs on Endless Search For Gold paint a pretty picture of dusty roads, forgotten memories and sweethearts from long ago, and while the stories envelope you, as the album meanders on you quickly become lost. The tracks blend into each other unable to assert themselves as stand alone songs. The wandering journey that the album takes you on is enjoyable, pleasant and entertaining but the sights you see along the way are forgettable. And while individually irrelevant the songs on Endless Search For Gold are intricately woven into a tapestry that results in an album that is ultimately gratifying.

 

BY KRYSTAL MAYNARD

 

Best Track: Black Coat, Black Hat
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