h

How will the budget strengthen Victoria’s creative industries?

Martin Foley, Minister for Creative Industries, has a simple explanation as to why the state government allocated the creative and cultural sector, with new initiatives totalling $78.7 million over four years, in the state budget in May. 

Image source: 
Harry Rae

“Victoria is the creative state and we’re keeping it that way – backing our creative institutions so they can continue to inspire Victorians, attract visitors and support jobs,” Foley said. “Whether you work in the creative industries or are a lover of art, fashion, music and theatre, we’re investing to make a creative experience for every Victorian.”

 

The Victorian First Peoples Creative Plan is a million dollar, two-year package of career-building initiatives to address employment barriers and increase self-determination for First Peoples in the creative industries. This includes paid work placements and internships, residencies and cultural exchange programs, and investment in First Peoples focused events and festivals. $2.9 million over four years will go to the Australian Performing Arts Market in Melbourne from 2020-2024, including a series of tailored showcase opportunities and a biennial industry event. This will be driven by a new independent office which will work year-round to connect performing arts creators with presenters and buyers from across the globe. A new $8.4m investment through Film Victoria, which it describes as an 'investment in film and television production.’

 

$31.6 million to transform the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI); to improve visitor experiences by 50 percent to two-million a year, support cutting-edge technology and expand educational programs for young creatives. A total of $34.8 million to upgrade key state-owned cultural institutions. This includes Museums Victoria (responsible for Melbourne Museum, Immigration Museum, Scienceworks and the Royal Exhibition Building) and funding boost to Geelong Performing Arts Centre to expand its operations and programming. In terms of contemporary music, the government had already announced pre-Budget initiatives as part of the $22.2 million Music Works package.

 

The first is the Victorian Music Development Office, to be run by Music Victoria, and includes an industry research program; a free event program featuring international speakers; an export-focused program that includes global marketing campaigns about Victorian acts; music business development activities including small business and enterprise lab; and a service providing free or low-cost advice to music businesses. The VMDO will also be in charge of setting up and running Support Acts for the Big Names, a campaign supporting diversity and inclusion in contemporary music programming. This campaign will focus on increasing live music opportunities for First Peoples, women, and under-represented artists by encouraging promoters to book these acts as support to larger musicians. The second initiative is the Music Market, a new cluster with hot desks and office spaces where musicians can work, learn, collaborate and do business. There will be a multipurpose space for events and exhibitions, a training room for education programs, and meeting rooms for the music industry to share ideas.