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Great Earthquake : Thinking and Making

It’s mindboggling to attribute such strong composition and talent to a single person. It’s also damn impressive.

For lovers of authentic sounding lo-fi indie, Great Earthquake’s Thinking and Making is an absolute treat to experience. Not only is each song riddled with catchy riffs, admirable drumming sections and a weary-but-warm style of vocal delivery, the record is performed entirely by one man and his loop pedal. It’s mindboggling to attribute such strong composition and talent to a single person, namely guitarist, bassist, drummer, vocalist, melodicist and glockenspielist Noah Symonds. It’s also damn impressive.

‘State I’m In’ opens the record smoothly with a bouncing progression, slowly becoming blanketed in texture by Symonds’ loops. Shuffly drums and the wear in his voice generates a palpable glumness, yet the lyrical relatability and repetition truly reaches out and grabs you in the spaces between the instruments. ‘Learn to Love the Ordinary’ runs with similarly earnest lyrics and near dreamy music, yet the positive message and the meaty bass hook makes for a much more colourful track than its predecessor.

Thinking and Making earns big points by staying genuine to itself. It feels more influenced by the wild hues of existence than trends or contemporary musicians – making it more human than art in its earnestness, yet more art than human because of its individuality.

7.5