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The Getaway Plan took us back to 2008 and we loved it

As soon as Wright sang those four words, 200 phones were held aloft and the room exploded. Bodies were flying through the air and every pair of feet started moving.

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Shiana Glenny

The Corner Hotel bandroom was already standing room only when Chasing Ghosts AKA Jimmy Kyle took the stage. A throng of die-hard Getaway Plan fans three rows deep watched intently as Kyle shouted his way through stripped back versions of Chasing Ghosts folk-punk back catalogue. Halfway through the second last song, Kyle abruptly stopped for a little audience participation. A bit of banter and instruction on how to sing along with this particular track and Kyle had won over a batch of new fans.
 
Melbourne’s Harbours seemed to be at the wrong show. This audience had long been in mosh-retirement and yet frontman Tory Robertson urged the audience to move up, take the mic, and jump at various times throughout the set to little avail. Harbours played the same alt-rock/punk of bands like Title Fight and Basement but with the stage show of a screamo band.
 
The sold out bandroom was full to the brim as the curtains pulled back and the piano intro of The Reckoning faded in. The crowd was instantly reminded of everything that made The Getaway Plan great a decade prior. Singer/guitarist Matthew Wright is an exceptional vocalist with a mammoth range and a killer falsetto. Songs like Dark Horses sounded massive, due in part to the excessive amount of backing tracks being used. A super slow rendition of Fleetwood Mac’s Dreams may have been unnecessary, but Battleships was huge and closed out the first set with a bang.
 
After a short break, it was time for set two – the band’s debut album Other Voices, Other Rooms. This was the version of The Getaway Plan we all remember – huge choruses, driving rhythms and the occasional breakdown. Album openers Other Voices/Other Rooms and Streetlight kick started the mosh pit and singalongs. The more heavier, screamo elements of their sound still slayed after all these years and the band clearly still love playing every moment. An album track list isn’t always suitable as a gig set list though. The band had opted to skip over Where The City Meets The Sea – saving it for later in the set, and slow mid-album song A Lover’s Complaint fell flat. As soon as Wright sang those four words, 200 phones were held aloft and the room exploded. Bodies were flying through the air and every pair of feet started moving. Where The City Meets The Sea is an absolute classic song and will clearly stand the test of time.
 
After a third short break, the band took the stage one last time to round out the set with Strings, completing the nostalgic throwback.
 
HighlightShadows.
Lowlight – The Fleetwood Mac cover. Can we all agree they’ve been done to death?  
Crowd FavouriteWhere The City Meets The Sea.