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Dean Lewis almost moved our reviewer to tears when he performed in Melbourne

It’s difficult to measure just how much potential Dean Lewis has, as currently his talent is astronomically immense. Judging by how much of the audience knew his set back to front, it’s fair to say Dean Lewis is a musical powerhouse who can only rise to the top.

The perfect opener for the night, Mt Warning’s Mikey Bee, serenaded the Howler bandroom with just an acoustic guitar. With lavish and layered studio recordings, the stripped back renditions of Sinking Sun and Midnight Dawn retained their gorgeous qualities. The bare instrumentation brought out the warmth of Bee’s exposed voice which created a soothing, almost uplifting atmosphere. Bee was a confident performer who had an infectious charm, especially when he whipped out an epic acoustic version of Whitney Houston’s I Wanna Dance With Somebody.
 
PLGRMS’ sound was dense, with ranging dynamic peaks and lows. The gigantic sounding duo, employed exotic samples that gave the beats a unique mark, creating a diverse but danceable background for Jacob Pearson’s dulcet falsetto vocals. Pieces and Dream You Up were groovy, enchanting tunes that were as beautiful as they were catchy. Pearson’s vocals were hauntingly splendid, creating a very emotionally conscious edge to a beat-oriented genre of music.
 
From the first bar of the stirring Lose My Mind, it was clear that Dean Lewis is an absolutely moving performer. With a silky smooth voice, his performance couldn’t have been more emotionally bare against the chilling chord stabs of his piano or the friendly fingerpicking of his guitar. This touching performance was refined by the utterly heartbreaking lyrics of Seven Minutes or Half A Man, the latter of which had Lewis pushing his microphone away and singing purely to the audience. If it weren’t for the anthemic singalongs to fan-favourite Chemicals, an audience member would swear they were alone in the room with Lewis. His musical prowess was shown in the audience’s word for word recollection of obscurer tunes like For The Last Time, something Lewis had nothing but gratefulness for. Easily shifting from piano to guitar, newer tunes like Be Alright and Tumble also showed a range of lyrical content.
 
It’s difficult to measure just how much potential Dean Lewis has, as currently his talent is astronomically immense. Judging by how much of the audience knew his set back to front, it’s fair to say Dean Lewis is a musical powerhouse who can only rise to the top.
 
Highlight: The moment where Dean Lewis pushed his microphone away. It was so beautiful and exposed.
Lowlight: Don’t talk during a performance. If you want to talk go to the bar.
Crowd favourite: Undeniably it was Waves.