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The Bombay Royale

Who are we chatting to? The Skipper.

Tell us about your album Run Kitty Run. Like our previous records, it’s the soundtrack to a lost film, this one a sci-fi as imagined by a Bollywood director in about 1982.  Like most sci-fi movies made at that time, it’s full of primitive synthesisers, android temptresses and imminent apocalypse.  And Roland disco hand claps.

The Bombay Royale blends a lot of different genres, sounds and cultures. What’s your creative process like? We write collectively and, while sometimes slow, we ultimately create something that none of us could produce alone.  It varies a bit from tune to tune but usually different members come in with some kind of creative musical seed and that acts as a creative springboard for the group.

What can we expect from a Bombay Royale live show? Like an old Bollywood film, we’re attempting to conjure a (B movie) world into life. The video projections and costumes are all there to support that.  There’s lots of colour and dancing and we generally throw every ounce of energy at it.

What is your favourite part of the creative process? The foremost is a live show when everything is humming and the audience and band are one, totally focused. After that, holding the finished album. On vinyl.

Soundvision celebrates 50 years of La Trobe University. How will you celebrate your 50th birthday? Having my brain transplanted into the body of a 20-year-old.  Preferably a human but whatever science allows at that point. 

The Bombay Royale will perform as part of Soundvision, taking place at La Trobe University on Saturday November 18. The event also features Remi, The Bombay Royale, The RAah Project, and more. They’ll also perform at Howler on Friday December 22.