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Shot on the Road: Photos From The Eyeball End

Sharing the stories of people from places such as Rwanda, Burundi, Ethiopia, Burma and Lebanon. 

What story does your exhibition tell? Shot on the Road: Photos From The Eyeball End is a photographic series that tells stories from places such as Rwanda, Burundi, Ethiopia, Burma and Lebanon. These are stories of regular people who had survived civil wars and genocide, yet still emerged with a smile.

How was this exhibition formed? In 2015, I had a 'punk rock travel book' published, called The Eyeball End, and this exhibition contains photos from those travels.These photos were shot on a low-budget 35mm film camera, and are on display as part of the 2018 Human Rights Arts and Film Festival.

Share something special we’ll always find at your exhibitions? Visitors to my photography exhibitions will always find a face, a story or a photograph that moves them, and inspires them to action.

How does your current exhibition challenge the audience? Shot on the Road: Photos From The Eyeball End challenges the audience to think deeper about human rights, and to engage with the world around us.My photography also challenges the notion of the 'Third World victim'. Instead of the traditional photojournalism of poverty, audiences will instead view people as equals, no matter what their circumstances.

What truths do you hope this exhibition exposes? This exhibition will expose the truth that people all over the world share the same humanity.No matter where I've been in the world – whether a refugee camp, a war-torn town or a street market – people will hold onto a quiet dignity, even if their circumstances are not dignified.

 

Shot on the Road: Photos From The Eyeball End will be displayed at Fitzroy Library from Saturday May 5 until Friday June 29. Opening night features spoken word artists Abe Nouk, Manisha Anjali and Jack Sheppard, and a Q&A with Ali MC.